HTML Input form* Attributes

HTML Input form* Attributes


This chapter describes the different form* attributes for the HTML <input> element.


The form Attribute

The input form attribute specifies the form the <input> element belongs to.

The value of this attribute must be equal to the id attribute of the <form> element it belongs to.

Example

An input field located outside of the HTML form (but still a part of the form):

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The formaction Attribute

The input formaction attribute specifies the URL of the file that will process the input when the form is submitted.

Note: This attribute overrides the action attribute of the <form> element.

The formaction attribute works with the following input types: submit and image.

Example

An HTML form with two submit buttons, with different actions:

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The formenctype Attribute

The input formenctype attribute specifies how the form-data should be encoded when submitted (only for forms with method=”post”).

Note: This attribute overrides the enctype attribute of the <form> element.

The formenctype attribute works with the following input types: submit and image.

Example

A form with two submit buttons. The first sends the form-data with default encoding, the second sends the form-data encoded as “multipart/form-data”:

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The formmethod Attribute

The input formmethod attribute defines the HTTP method for sending form-data to the action URL.

Note: This attribute overrides the method attribute of the <form> element.

The formmethod attribute works with the following input types: submit and image.

The form-data can be sent as URL variables (method=”get”) or as an HTTP post transaction (method=”post”).

Notes on the “get” method:

  • This method appends the form-data to the URL in name/value pairs
  • This method is useful for form submissions where a user want to bookmark the result
  • There is a limit to how much data you can place in a URL (varies between browsers), therefore, you cannot be sure that all of the form-data will be correctly transferred
  • Never use the “get” method to pass sensitive information! (password or other sensitive information will be visible in the browser’s address bar)

Notes on the “post” method:

  • This method sends the form-data as an HTTP post transaction
  • Form submissions with the “post” method cannot be bookmarked
  • The “post” method is more robust and secure than “get”, and “post” does not have size limitations

Example

A form with two submit buttons. The first sends the form-data with method=”get”. The second sends the form-data with method=”post”:

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The formtarget Attribute

The input formtarget attribute specifies a name or a keyword that indicates where to display the response that is received after submitting the form.

Note: This attribute overrides the target attribute of the <form> element.

The formtarget attribute works with the following input types: submit and image.

Example

A form with two submit buttons, with different target windows:

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The formnovalidate Attribute

The input formnovalidate attribute specifies that an <input> element should not be validated when submitted.

Note: This attribute overrides the novalidate attribute of the <form> element.

The formnovalidate attribute works with the following input types: submit.

Example

A form with two submit buttons (with and without validation):

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The novalidate Attribute

The novalidate attribute is a <form> attribute.

When present, novalidate specifies that all of the form-data should not be validated when submitted.

Example

Specify that no form-data should be validated on submit:

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HTML Form and Input Elements

Tag Description
<form> Defines an HTML form for user input
<input> Defines an input control

For a complete list of all available HTML tags, visit our HTML Tag Reference.

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